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Take Advantage Of The Opportunity For All Your Digital Publishing Needs On Android

It can be difficult to keep up with the latest and greatest in Smartphone and tablet technology, with so many different applications and reading availability, but everyone has their lovers and haters. Some people love Android, some people love Apple, but which is the best? The answer is clearer than you may think. The Android is beginning to be a leader in the Smartphone OS battle. Although just a few years ago were merely a curiosity is now a huge and advanced platform. It has an extensive development community that is creating applications for the Android that rival Apple. In this case, that means that marketing your Magazines on Android now will save you money right now and balloon in the very near future.
It is very likely that the Android tablet is going to become as much a force as its counterpart. For anyone that is marketing magazines on Android or any other type of Digital Publishing, this potential is incredible. Android tablets are still a bit rough, but that makes it all the more intriguing. Android has an extensive and proven record, a bionetwork and development community that rivals Apple, and with the raw power of Google to launch it. The future of the Android tablet is exemplary, and with the world’s foremost eReaders set to adopt the Android platforms, the Android tablet is sure to explode on the market.
What does this mean for you and your business? It means that you should think outside the box right now for your future digital publishing marketing of magazines on Android. This positive and quick change in the tablet marketplace is going to launch the Android tablets to the level of Apple, perhaps beyond it. Any type of format that makes good business sense is an excellent opportunity for growth and expansion of business, and you need to have the confidence, know how and brute strength in understanding of what is happening in the technological world right now. Digital publishing is all about your reach, knowledge and grasping at every opportunity available, and this means that it should be in the hands of every person all over the world, regardless of their personal devices they are using. This is why it is imperative to launch your magazines on Android, Apple and more.
All of the platforms that you have access to are used across iPad, Android, and WebOS. All of this will very shortly work in conjunction via HTML5 web applications, as well as keeping informed of the latest and greatest in new technology, OS operating systems and so much more. You deserve to be noticed all over the world, and through the use of the ever-growing Android tablet OS and other unique and incredible emerging platforms, the opportunities are endless. By choosing to run all of your magazines on Android, and all of your other digital publishing needs, you do not have to worry about your platform. All you have to worry about is the content and making money.…

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Engaging Today’s Students in Active Learning (Part 4)

In Part 2 of this series we discussed barriers to active learning – various causes that impact students’ ability or willingness to learn. In Part 3 we looked at strategies to grab students’ interest and get them involved in their own learning. Now we’ll examine teacher behaviors that impact learning.
Excellence in the Classroom: Modeling excellence increases the likelihood of teachers receiving excellence from their students. This generation of students displays a heightened sense of intolerance for mediocrity. They possess a greater ability than previous generations to discern genuine concern and ability (in other words, they are hyper-sensitive to phonies). Many teachers perpetuate a double standard; they expect more from students than they exhibit in the classroom themselves. Students take offense at this behavior and ultimately demand more of teachers. In fact, this inconsistency is rarely forgotten, and most often becomes a rift in the trust relationship between student and teacher. Students need to see teachers perform in the classroom to the same high standard students are expected to perform. By the same token, teachers are not expected to be experts in every subject; in fact, students respond well in reverse-mentoring situations where teachers learn from students-providing a reciprocal relationship. Teacher attitudes significantly affect their relationship with students.
The current student culture demonstrates short attention spans, a powerful need for immediate gratification, and a thirst for technology. Boring rooms lead to bored students. Teachers are tasked with stimulating energy and enthusiasm in even the most mundane subjects and students are very conscious of the effort teachers exhibit-or more often, did not exhibit.
One of the most challenging yet exciting additions to curriculum in today’s culture is multimedia technology. Teachers and administration are called upon to manage change amidst the turmoil of adolescence, while they maintain standardized test scores, as well as classroom composure.
The use of computers demonstrates an increase in student motivation to learn. Both teachers and students report a greater interest and motivation by the students when multimedia is incorporated into the curriculum. Research shows that students are able to remain on task longer when technology is involved in the learning process. Furthermore, the use of technology increases students’ skills in note taking, information gathering, collaboration, documentation, and presentation design. It appears that from a behavioral perspective, today’s students are often expected to perform in the same manner as students 30 years ago rather than as students of the current technological era.
Through the use of computers, this generation’s students are able to achieve greater quantity and quality in a day’s study. When students and teachers both have a basic grasp of technology, students show greater motivation through interest and time spent engaged in learning activities, as well as students’ ability to maintain and incorporate what they learn.
Students of this generation already embrace technology. Greater than 90 percent of the teen population (ages 9 to 17) access the internet; approximately 84 percent of those log into social media. Although the current trend in the work place is moving toward social media use on the job, it is more the younger crowd that embraces the technology. Teachers and students benefit through the use of social media since teachers could control when they log onto a service (better control than students having the teachers’ phone numbers) and students experience a deeper sense of trust and genuine concern from the teachers. Students are able to request extra help or gain a deeper explanation to an assignment without the added social consequences of their peers’ observation. However, the majority of school districts prohibit teachers and students from connecting through social media at any time; in fact, teachers caught in such situations are immediately fired.
Allowing students to email assignments as an alternative to handing in a hard copy reduces their need for printers, paper, and ink cartridges. Adding email as an option eliminates or reduces many excuses for late assignments.
Regularly posting and updating class web pages allows students to be independent and proactive about double-checking assignments, reviewing class notes or syllabi, and preparing for upcoming classes. Students feel more satisfied with their learning experience when they can participate through technology. Some theorists believe that students will not develop responsibility if assignments are posted on the school website where they can easily be retrieved; however, such a practice is far more consistent with this generation’s use of technology to access assignments, information, research, and other tools via the web than any previous generation. Social media, internet use, email, and other forms of technology are part of this generation’s toolbox. Their skilled use of these tools is essential to their future success. Teachers who guide this current generation would be wise to accept their unique abilities and guide them in using those abilities in a productive way.
When teachers show a concerted …

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Blu Ray Player Technology

The BD-P1600’s connectivity is standard. The main connection is the HDMI output, which is capable of handling 1080p HD video and high-resolution multichannel audio. There’s also a component-video output that can output Blu-ray at 1080i and standard DVDs at 480p. Audio connections are basic, including an optical digital-audio output and an analog-stereo output. There’s also an Ethernet port on the back, plus a USB port that can be used with the Wi-Fi adapter. There’s an additional USB port on the front panel as well.
While we appreciate the fact that the BD-P1600 is Wi-Fi ready, the benefit isn’t that practical. The USB Wi-Fi dongle carries a list price of $80, bringing the overall cost of the BD-P1600 close to the step-up BD-P3600, which includes the Wi-Fi adapter in the box. Considering that the BD-P3600 has additional step-up features–like 7.1 analog outputs, onboard memory, and PC streaming–we’d suggest stepping up to the BD-P3600 if you want Wi-Fi access. Alternatively, you can implement your own solution using a PowerLine network for about $80 as well.
Blu-ray performance Image quality on entry-level Blu-ray players isn’t always up to par, so we were interested in how the BD-P1600 would handle our tests. We started off with Silicon Optix’s HQV test suite, with the BD-P1600 connected to a Sony KDL-52XB7 via HDMI.
The BD-P1600 outperformed our expectations on the test disc. It aced the Video Resolution Test, showing the full detail of Blu-ray without any jaggies showing up on the rotating white line. Next up were two video-based jaggies tests and the BD-P1600 performed well again, with crisp image quality free of jaggies. It passed the Film Resolution Test as well, depicting both the initial test pattern and the long panning shot of Raymond James Stadium without major image defects.
We switched over to actual program material, and the BD-P1600 didn’t let up. We fired up “Mission: Impossible III” and the panning sequence at the beginning of chapter eight looked perfect, lacking any moire visible in the stairs. It also handled Chapter 16 well, with the trimming of the limo looking jaggy-free as it approaches Tom Cruise. Next we looked at “Ghost Rider” and the end of Chapter six was properly rendered, with the BD-P1600 showing no moire in the grille of the RV as the camera pans away. Last up was the video-based “Tony Bennett: An American Classic” and the BD-P1600 did an acceptable job, with only a few jaggies visible in the striped shirts of the dancers. It’s worth pointing out that we got nearly identical performance on all these scenes from the step-up BD-P3600, as well the Panasonic DMP-BD60.
One of the biggest letdowns of Blu-ray compared with DVD so far has been how much slower and less responsive standalone Blu-ray players are at loading and navigating discs. Samsung’s new 2009 players, including the BD-P1600, have made a lot of progress in this regard. For example, the BD-P1600 loaded “Mission: Impossible III” in just 16 seconds, compared with 21 seconds on the Panasonic DMP-BD60. The differences are even greater on discs with elaborate menus; the Samsung loaded “Spiderman 3” in a minute and 3 seconds, compared with a minute and 27 seconds on the DMP-BD60. Beside just disc loading, we found the BD-P1600 to be considerably more responsive than most Blu-ray players–and nearly as speedy as the PS3–although just a tad slower than the step-up BD-P3600. If you like to demo your favorite action scenes for friends, the quick navigation is a blessing.
Standard DVD performance There are still many more movies available on standard DVD than Blu-ray, so standard-def performance still matters. We started off looking at test patterns from Silicon Optix’s HQV test suite, with the BD-P1600 upscaling to 1080p.
The BD-P1600 started off strong, resolving all the detail of the initial resolution pattern without any image instability that we sometimes see on lesser players. Next up were two video-based jaggies tests, and the BD-P1600 stumbled, failing both tests, as jaggies were visible on both the rotating white line and three pivoting lines. On the other hand, it had no problems with the 2:3 pulldown test, as we couldn’t see any moire in the grandstands as the race car drove by.
We moved onto program material, starting with “Star Trek: Insurrection,” and the BD-P1600 deftly handled the introduction, rendering both the hulls of the boats and the curved bridge railings smoothly. We flipped over to the difficult introduction of “Seabiscuit” and the BD-P1600 performed well again, lacking the jaggies and other image distortions that so frequently show up on this disc. That being said, we had the Panasonic DMP-BD60 on hand to directly compare, and we’d give the nod to the Panasonic for DVD playback, as it had a slightly cleaner and sharper look to it.…

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Dealership Technology – Solution or Problem?

I was recently visiting with a dealer in southeastern Pa., and we were discussing his new database management program. I was interested in what it did, and he was more than happy to tell me. He said “This program completely takes my salespeople out of any and all follow-up with my customers!” Knowing how turnover in sales can dramatically affect a dealership’s long-term sales, I didn’t think much of it at that moment.
As I was driving back to the office, I thought about what he had said again… “This program completely takes my salespeople out of any and all follow-up with my customers!” It was at that moment I realized that maybe too much is TOO MUCH!
Why do most sales technologies distance the customer from the actual HUMAN BEING in the dealership? Is that REALLY what we need in our business? Did I miss the memo about keeping customers and salespeople as far apart as possible?
In fairness, there are MANY wonderful tools available through many fine companies. But there is a point where you need to consider whether technology is a solution or a problem. In my opinion, that point is where you find yourself substituting technology for actual sales. Actual sales – you know – the process of one human being transferring excitement about a product or service to another human being – resulting in a mutually beneficial relationship.
Do you want a computer selling to your customers? Do you want a customer buying from an interactive software program or DVD? Remember when you had a big ugly VCR in your finance office? I once asked a finance manager what it was there for, and he told me it was a credit insurance presentation on videotape. I asked how it was working for him, and he just laughed and said “How do you think?”
Working in F&I development allows me a certain amount of understanding of what will work and what will not. If a dealer wants to have a highly productive F&I department, there is no secret in how to accomplish the task: Hire the best people on the best pay-plan with the best desk procedures imaginable. Train those people and hold them accountable.
If you are a dealer that is only interested in F&I as a service you provide your customers to make their purchase convenient, and not necessarily an important profit center, technology based sales programs will work wonders for you. But if you are looking for F&I to provide important income to your bottom line… think PEOPLE FIRST… and save your money on anything that claims to sell your customer with technology.…